Unfair
126 reviews
 
The game concept/design is solid - scavenge supplies, rebuild your base, try to rebuild the car to get out of town - but there are a couple fatal flaws that really hurt the gameplay.

The main one is the AI - it's dumb as a box of rocks, and will walk through toxic slime (which kills the character in a few seconds) without hesitation, even when there's an easy path around it. Most of my damage and deaths in this game were due to the AI making stupid decisions.

And when a character "dies", they can be revived for around 15 seconds - which is fine except that it takes like 7 seconds to actually revive them. The timer doesn't stop as you're reviving, which means that if you get to the character with 3 seconds left on their timer, there's no chance you can save them.

It makes it frustrating if you're in the middle of fighting zombies and can't start healing immediately. I'm sure there are upgrades to make heals faster, but it's still a flawed design.
 
A solid little ninja-platformer where you click on enemies to teleport to them rather than jumping. The boss fights are particularly fun!

My only gripe is that in the normal levels I sometimes have to click twice to get my character to teleport to an enemy (I think it's because he isn't finished with his slice-and-dice of the current enemy). That's the only thing holding me back from saying this is really good.
 
I quite enjoyed this, although about 45 minutes in I'm already 100% done with 2 out of 5 worlds and well on my way to finishing the third, and the game still doesn't seem as "punishing" as the store description would lead you to believe.

There's no downside to losing or restarting a level, and the "brutal rule" of one move, one life lost, is the core puzzle mechanic of the game - you count your steps to nearby life pickups, and figure out the order you need to survive.

This gets more challenging when enemies move at certain intervals as well, but I only found one level so far where that really complicated matters. Overall it was a relaxing and enjoyable puzzle experience so far.
 
Interesting concept, but the implementation is really rough and basic - to even restart you have to exit the game, and when you die any stuff you're carrying is irrecoverably lost.

I'm on the fence about whether to give this an "Okay" or a "Bad" rating, because it's relatively cheap and I like it a lot better than most horror games that use this graphical style, but it's sorely in need of a tutorial and a lot of polishing.

Your character seems to know what needs to be done to fix the apocalypse, and it would be nice if the game told you too, although that minor mystery probably makes it more interesting than the repetition would be otherwise.
 
While I like the general idea, the interface for "hacking" feels clunky, and the graphical style isn't stylized enough to quickly convey what items are interactable (and what they do) both in the world itself and in the top-down hacking view.

This is kind of a big deal when the "par" time limits are so tight that it's very hard to beat them even if you know what you're doing, much less when you have to hover over a bunch of stuff using controls that seem more tailored to a game controller.

You don't have to beat the levels under par to progress, but it's kind of pointless for them to even exist if you can't hit the times even when you do well. Though it's a bit strange to even have timed runs in a stealth/strategy puzzle game.
 
More like Oregon Trail than FTL: Faster Than Light, you have to balance your shields, power, and faction alliances. It seems like many encounters have a preferred way of dealing with them, so a decent amount of this game is just trial and error, seeing what happens if you use Offense/Passive/Contact on a specific encounter.

As you go through these encounters your ship levels up based on how your crew is assigned. Still not sure what these levels actually do, but I've only played for a short time so far.

Please note: as of Jan 2, 2018 the fullscreen mode is still broken on Windows 10, you get a black screen. This can be fixed by setting the game exe to Windows 7 compatibility mode, but it's a shame you have to do that.
 
This feels much more satisfying and well-tuned than the original Sanctum - and the addition of co-op takes it to a whole new difficulty level.
 
The combination of tower defense and hack-n-slash works fairly well together, though the classes are completely unbalanced. Melee is by far the easiest.
 
While not co-op like the sequel, this game has an excellent sense of humor and decently balanced maps. Too bad the humor didn't carry over to Orcs Must Die! 2
 
They added co-op, but lost some of the humor that made Orcs Must Die! so fun. Similar gameplay, with more expansive levels to challenge two players.
 
Essentially a rage platformer in first-person. You die, restart, try to find the button you missed or avoid the trap you stepped into, performing the exact same sequence of actions over and over, getting a little further each time.

Most traps are visible if you know what you're looking for, although you can't always avoid them. Sometimes the hitboxes are inexplicably large and maul you when you try to dodge. Not a huge issue, just means you missed a switch, but trying to figure out a puzzle in that sort of deadly environment can sometimes be frustrating and time consuming.
 
Another interesting concept from the creator of Hexcells, but keep in mind it is pretty short - probably around 2-3 hours if you're familiar with the concept of the other games.

This one adds a little extra complication by introducing multiplication, as well as multi-directional numbers. So the row multiplied forwards and backwards has to match the numbers on either end.

This was a nice twist, although I sort of wish it showed a subtotal by each required number so that you wouldn't have to repeatedly figure out tough rows in your head. It's a bit much having to add and multiply a series of numbers 5-10 times forward and backward to work out the combination that fits.

Overall though, another unique and interesting creation that will please puzzle fans for a couple hours.
 
As of 12/29/17 this still feels very much like an early access concept that needs tweaking and ease of use upgrades before I'd recommend it. The micromanagement required for gathering resources is pretty high, having to select each type of resource independently and the area you want them to gather within.

I'd much prefer a classic RTS type gathering where the AI is a bit smarter than a dumb drone. And as much as I like being able to research and add a trailer to carry buildings with the caravan, I don't know why this isn't default. Seems odd to have to build new buildings every 10 minutes when you switch maps.

Additionally the level-end timer doesn't give you any obvious indicator that your time is about to run out - if you're not paying attention you can lose the game very abruptly.
 
A gorgeous little mobile port that doesn't give you any explanation of how to play it. And it also has poor click tracking, often not using your actions unless you click the tiles very precisely.

It has 21 levels total, and three simple actions for your character to perform. Although the random heights of the tiles created by the Raise Tile action seems antithetical to the puzzles. Since you can only walk to tiles that are the same or one different from your current height, this height randomness can ruin a perfectly good strategy.

There are probably some advanced features or uses for the abilities that I haven't yet figured out in the first 6 levels, but I feel like that's the game's fault for not clearly explaining the rules so the player can focus on strategy and winning, not trial and error.
 
Starts out simple, but to be really good at this game you have to be able to multi-task incredibly accurately and quickly. That just isn't me, but the game is well designed and will be fun for people who love the challenge of optimizing their strategy and reaction times to climb the leaderboard.
 
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